Ephemeral and transient: tags on Fuencarral

Walking down Fuencarral street in Madrid, looking around and running into public texts whose proliferation make up, in part, the shared space of the city. In the background, to the right, in red and blue, traffic signs informing that parking is prohibited. In red and white, a bank sign, and up above, in white and blue, an ATM sign. Signs of order, signs of capital and commerce, and marks of private property that the state and its institutions have taught us to read, naturalizing their logics.  These signs coexist with other signs that demand from us other methods of reading and an other type of relation with the city: tags:  signatures using a pseudonyn in public space. In the foreground, tags in yellow going around the base, and tags in white going up the lower part of three street lamps on Fuencarral. Yellow and white on black. These signs are persecuted and criminalized.  They do not rely on the “legality” granted by capital.

redesycalles 9528 amp

redesycalles 9528 rt

redesycalles 9529 rt

redesycalles 3 nov IMG_9527 copyFuencarral, Madrid, 3 de noviembre de 2014.

Coming back to the same street a month and a half later. The signs of capital are still there, but the tags are gone. The have been washed out by the city hall.  There is neither space nor desire here for melancholy or nostalgia.  Tags are meant to disappear:  their very condition of marks on the street, their mode of occupying the street, is signed by uncertainty and transience. They may stay for a month, a day, an hour. In a beautiful text, writer Dumaar Freemaninov (aka Nov York, aka Dumar Brown) talks about graffiti as a “philosophical frame”:  “Just as with the Tibetan Buddhist Mandala, graffiti is not meant to last long but instead its function is wrapped up in ritual and deep understanding that all is temporary and life is but a dream.  This tag too shall pass.  It’s rather freeing to think tagging the walls of your city is a path towards enlightenment” (“Foreword” xvii. In Ornament and Order: Graffiti, Street Art, and the Parergon by Rafael Schacter, 2014.).  It is in uncertainty and transience, in the echoes of their ephemeral and transitory condition, where  the potency of tags resides as a medium for reflection about our own occupation of the city and the planet.

redesycalles IMG_0448Fuencarral, Madrid, 23 de diciembre de 2014.

Advertisements

Efímeros y pasajeros: tags en Fuencarral

Andar por Fuencarral, en Madrid, mirar alrededor y encontrarse con los textos públicos cuya proliferación y lectura hacen, en buena parte, el espacio compartido de la ciudad. Al fondo, a la derecha, en rojo y en azul, señales de tráfico prohibiendo estacionarse. En rojo y en blanco, el rótulo luminoso de un banco, y encima, en blanco y en azul, el de su cajero automático. Signos de un cierto orden, del capital y del comercio y marcas de la propiedad privada que el estado y sus instituciones nos enseñan a leer, naturalizando sus lógicas. Esos signos coexisten con otros que nos exigen otros métodos de lectura y otro tipo de relación con la ciudad: tags:  firmas con seudónimo en el espacio público. En el primer plano, tags en amarillo rodeando en horizontal la base, y en blanco y en vertical la parte inferior del poste de tres farolas en Fuencarral.  Amarillo y blanco sobre negro pizarra. Signos perseguidos, criminalizados. No cuentan con la “legalidad” que otorga el capital.

redesycalles 9528 amp

redesycalles 9528 rt

redesycalles 9529 rt

redesycalles 3 nov IMG_9527 copyFuencarral, Madrid, 3 de noviembre de 2014.

Volver mes y medio más tarde a la misma calle. Los signos del capital siguen todavía, pero los tags ya no están. Han sido lavados por el ayuntamiento. No hay aquí espacio ni deseo por la melancolía ni la nostalgia.  El destino de los tags es desaparecer: su condición misma de marca en la calle, su modo de ocupación de la calle, está signada por la incertidumbre y la transitoriedad. Pueden quedarse un mes como quedarse un día o una hora.  En un bello texto, el escritor Dumaar Freemaninov (aka Nov York, aka Dumar Brown) habla del graffiti como “marco filosófico”:  “Just as with the Tibetan Buddhist Mandala, graffiti is not meant to last long but instead its function is wrapped up in ritual and deep understanding that all is temporary and life is but a dream.  This tag too shall pass.  It’s rather freeing to think tagging the walls of your city is a path towards enlightenment” (“Foreword” xvii. En Ornament and Order: Graffiti, Street Art, and the Parergon de Rafael Schacter, 2014.).  En la incertidumbre y la transitoriedad, en los ecos de su condición efímera y pasajera, radica una parte de la potencia de los tags, del graffiti, como medio de reflexión sobre nuestra propia ocupación de la ciudad y del planeta..

redesycalles IMG_0448Fuencarral, Madrid, 23 de diciembre de 2014.

Looking at Madrid’s Capitol Building: Graffiti on Phone Booths at Plaza del Callao

Tags on phone booths on Gran Vía and Callao Square in Madrid: but not on all of them: one is located at the entrance to the square, two to the right side of Cine Callao, and another in front of  the Carrión or Capitol Building.  Tags by Ron’s Club, by Mile, by Relim, in yellow and white on the black surfaces of public phones. “We know that what constitutes graffiti is in fact neither the inscription nor its message but the wall, the background, the surface (the desktop); it is because the background exists fully, as an object which has already lived, that such writing always comes to it  as an enigmatic surplus […] it is insofar as the background is not clean that it is […] suitable to everything that remains (art, indolence, pulsion, sensuality, irony, taste […])” (Roland Barthes, “Cy Twombly”, The Responsibility of Forms,1985: 167).  Tags on phone booths looking at the Capitol Building.

redesycalles 9687 rtTags by Mile & Ron’s Club on phone booth.  O the left: pasteup by Wolf Street Artist, tag by TIL, stickers by NEW others.  Gran Vía, 19 Nov. 2014.

redesycalles 9692 rtTag by Relim on booth on the side of Cine Callao, on the street across the Capitol Building. 19 Nov. 2014.

redesycalles 9695 rtTags by Relim  & Ron’s Club on booth behind the one in the picture above. 19 Nov. 2014.

redesycalles 9693 rtThe two phone booths on the right side of Cine Callao, on the street across the Capitol Building.

Surfaces and backgrounds.  Lonesome phone booths, displaced by the massive use of cell phones and call centers. Boards on the street.  Gran Vía and Plaza del Callao: Madrid’s emblematic shopping and leisure centers from the early 20th century.  The Carrión or Capitol Building, built between 1931-1933, is, as Alan Compitello observes, “one of the anchors of the first major modernization project in Madrid, the expansion of the Gran Vía from the Calle de Alcalá to the Plaza de España (“From Planning to Design…,” 1999: 206).  Carlos Ramos highlights the utopian dimension of that section of the Gran Vía: the Capitol Building was greeted as a powerful symbol of a Madrid wanting to be modern (Construyendo la modernidad… 2010: 195).  Of course, the symbolic significance of the building and the avenue changed with time. In the 21st century, Ramos notes that, unable to produce cosmopolitan illusions, the Capitol Building supports a surviving fantasy: that of consumerism (197).

Carlos Delgado 1024px-Gran_Vía_-_01Photo by Carlos Delgado, 23 May 2014, in Wikimedia Commons. To the left, between Cine Callao and the Capitol Building (with the Schweppes sign) you can see three of the four phone booths.  The fourth (the first that appears in this post) falls outside of the visual range: it would be to the  bottom right.

Tags: graffiti: marginal writings looking at the Capitol Building.  From its position of autonomy with respect to the fictions of consumerism, graffiti on public spaces opens questions about the possible futures of the city. “[…] They are beyond urban / measurements, in a different situation  […] they discourse on other / foundations” (Diamela Eltit, E.Luminata, trans. by Ronald Christ,  1997: 121).

redesycalles 19 nov IMG_9699 copyTags by Mile & Ron’s.

redesycalles 19 nov IMG_9697 copyTags by Mile y Ron’s, sticker by BLMZ. 19 Nov. 2015.

 

To see other tags by Ron’s Club, check out these photos by Vandal Voyeur, @graffitimadrid1, and Guillermo de la Madrid, among others.   To see other tags by Mile, you can start with this photo by @madrink, and these photos in the blog Escrito en la Pared.  To see pieces by Wolf Street Artist, check out his gallery in flickr.

For a brief historical introduction to the Gran Vía, see this video by Benjamin Fraser, from the Gran Vía Madrid-An Interactive Digital Humanities Project, created by the members of a graduate class at the College of Charleston in the spring of 2014.  It also has a section on Edifición Carrión (Capitol Building).

Mirando al Capitol: Graffiti en cabinas en la Plaza del Callao

Tags en cabinas telefónicas en Gran Vía y Plaza del Callao en Madrid: no en todas: una al inicio de la plaza, dos al costado del cine Callao, y otra al pie del edificio Carrión o Capitol. Tags de Ron’s Club, de Mile, de Relim, en amarillo y blanco sobre las superficies negras de teléfonos públicos. “Es bien sabido que lo que hace al graffiti no es, a decir verdad, ni la inscripción ni su mensaje; es el muro, el fondo, la mesa.  A causa de que el fondo existe plenamente, como un objeto que ya ha tenido vida, la escritura se le añade siempre como un suplemento enigmático: […] en la medida en que el fondo no está limpio […] resulta apropiado para todo lo demás (el arte, la pereza, la pulsión, la sensualidad, la ironía, el gusto)” (Roland Barthes, “Cy Twombly”, Lo obvio y lo obtuso,1986: 170).  Tags en cabinas telefónicas mirando al Capitol.

redesycalles 9687 rtTags de Mile & Ron’s Club en la cabina.  A la izquierda: pasteup de Wolf Street Artist, tag de TIL, stickers de NEW y otros.  Gran Vía, 19 Noviembre, 2014.

redesycalles 9692 rtTag de Relim en cabina a un costado del Cine Callao, en la acera al frente del Capitol. 19 Noviembre, 2014.

redesycalles 9695 rtTags de Relim  & Ron’s Club en cabina atrás de la anterior. 19 Noviembre, 2014.

redesycalles 9693 rtLas dos cabinas al costado del Cine Callao, al frente del Capitol.

Superficies y fondos.  Cabinas telefónicas solitarias por el uso masivo de móviles y locutorios.  Pizarras a pie de calle. Gran Vía y Plaza del Callao: centros de consumo y ocio madrileños a principio del siglo XX.  El Edificio Carrión o Capitol, construido entre 1931 y 1933, constituye, como observa Alan Compitello, uno de los pilares del proyecto de modernización de Madrid: la expansión de la Gran Vía desde la Calle de Alcalá a la Plaza de España (“From Planning to Design…”, 1999: 206).  Carlos Ramos subraya la dimensión utópica de ese tramo de la Gran Vía: “el edificio fue saludado como un símbolo poderoso del Madrid que quería ser moderno” (Construyendo la modernidad… 2010: 195).  La importancia simbólica del edificio, y de la arteria, fue, por supuesto, cambiando a través de los años. En el siglo XXI, apunta Ramos, “agotada su capacidad de generar ilusiones de cosmopolitismo, el Capitol es ahora soporte de la quimera superviviente, la del consumo” (197).

Carlos Delgado 1024px-Gran_Vía_-_01Foto de Carlos Delgado, 23 Mayo 2014, en Wikimedia Commons. En la foto se puede ver a mano izquierda, entre el Cine Callao y el Capitol, tres de las cuatro cabinas.  La otra (la primera en este post) escapa el campo visual: estaría en el borde inferior derecho de esta foto.

Tags: graffiti: escrituras marginales en cabinas mirando al edificio Capitol. Desde su autonomía con respecto a las ficciones del consumismo, el graffiti en los espacios públicos abre interrogaciones sobre los futuros posibles de la ciudad. “[…] Ellos están fuera de mediciones / urbanas, en otra situación […] ésos tematizan sobre otras / fundaciones” (Diamela Eltit, Lumpérica, 1983: 123).

redesycalles 19 nov IMG_9699 copyTags de Mile & Ron’s.

redesycalles 19 nov IMG_9697 copyTags de Mile y Ron’s, sticker de BLMZ. Frente al Capitol. 19 Noviembre, 2015.

 

Para ver otras imágenes de graffiti de Ron’s Club: fotos por Vandal Voyeur, @graffitimadrid1, Guillermo de la Madrid, entre otros.   Para ver otras imágenes de Mile:  fotos por @madrink, y por el blog Escrito en la Pared.  Para Wolf Street Artist, su galería en flickr.

Para una breve introducción histórica a la Gran Vía, pueden ver este video de Benjamin Fraser, que es parte de Gran Vía Madrid-An Interactive Digital Humanities Project, creado por los miembros de un curso graduado en el College of Charleston en la primavera del 2014.  Contiene una sección sobre el Edifición Carrión (o Capitol).